20150312 - Academic - Makdisi Poster
12 MARCH 2015
UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA
QUIET ROOM, ST. JOHN’S COLLEGE

 

The conventional view of sectarianism in the Middle East is that it reflects age-old, endemic religious tensions, and that it reflects a problem in the region’s adaptation to a secular Western modernity. Sectarianism has often been depicted as a holdover of primordial religious divisions that make up the Middle East. In contrast, this talk suggests that the sectarian crisis in the Middle East has its roots in the nineteenth century Ottoman Empire that sought to adapt to European power and to introduce political equality, and in the post-Ottoman Middle East that has seen a series of Western powers, most recently the United States, dominate the region.